blog


The key to successful investing isn’t predicting the future, it’s learning from the past and understanding the present. In Principles, we present seven time-tested strategies for guiding investors and their portfolios through challenging markets and toward tomorrow's goals.

The Ray Lucia Show: 04/24/2017 hour 2

Principles for successful long-term investing The key to successful investing isn't predicting the future, it's learning from the past and understanding the present. In Principles, we present seven time-tested strategies for guiding investors and their portfolios through challenging markets and toward tomorrow's goals.

Read more

Frustrated with the investment options in your company sponsored 401(k) plan? You might be able to rollover all or some of your or all of your 401(k) plan to a self-directed IRA and open up your retirement account to the possibility to outside investments.

There’s an old saying in the investment business, “It’s not what you earn, it’s what you keep.” Unfortunately too many investors take that to the extreme and end up paying far more in taxes in the long run.

Take, for example, a married couple who thinks they’re pulling a fast one on Uncle Sam by investing their personal money in tax-free muni’s and their retirement funds in stocks. They may pay little or no tax now, but when they turn age 70-1/2, and are forced to take fully taxable required minimum distributions, their tax bill could soar. And when one of them passes away, the survivor files an individual not a joint tax return. As a result, they’ll end up paying even more in taxes. A much...

Read more

A balanced portfolio of the typical 60/40 mix of stocks and bonds may not be as productive as you might think.

According to Bret Arends of Smart Money, a re-balanced 60/40 portfolio would have averaged an 8% return since 1920. That number is misleading. It not only ignores inflation but most of those gains came in just two booms: during the 1950’s and in the past 30 years. For other periods the returns were meager or non-existent, in fact from 1937 to 1950 and from 1965 to 1982 a re-balanced 60/40 portfolio would have yielded absolutely nothing after inflation.

This is why as investors we must look at adding alternative investments in real estate, debt, commodities, life annuities, and other insured investments to a balanced portfo...

Read more

If you are nearing retirement and still working you may want to consider allocating your funds to a decumulation strategy right now. That’s because you never know what tomorrow may bring.

It’s not just retirees and pre-retirees that need to focus on decumulation. No one knows if or when they’ll lose their jobs or become ill and need to tap into their retirement funds.

A decumulation strategy differs greatly from an accumulation strategy as it takes into account how to invest in order provide income at whatever point you may need it.

A comprehensive decumulation strategy may involve buying annuities, inflation protected bonds, and alternative income investments that are not likely to be found in your 401k plan.

You may a...

Read more

I’m a big fan of mutual funds. Investing can be simpler if you forget about the individual stocks and stick with mutual funds.

They’re pretty close to being one-stop shopping for investors. And therein lies a problem: Do you buy’em and forget’em?

A lot of investors do. But I want to remind you that a portfolio of even the best funds needs attention.

A key question: is your money divvied up the way you want among stock funds, bond funds, and cash-equivalent money market funds? This is called asset allocation, and it likely will significantly affect your future returns.

No one mix is right for every investor. So what you need to do – on your own or with your advisor – is decide on your ideal allocation.T...

Read more